Winger

A winger or wide midfielder is a midfielder located on the wing of the midfield. Traditionally, wingers were purely attacking players who hugged the touch line and were not expected to track back and defend. This began to change around the time of the 1966 World Cup, when England manager Alf Ramsey led a team without natural wingers to the championship. This team was known as the “Wingless Wonders” and led to the modern 4-4-2 formation.

This has led to most modern wide players having a more demanding role in the sense that they are expected to provide defensive cover for their full-backs and track back to repossess the ball, as well as provide skillful crosses for centre forwards and strikers. Some forwards are able to operate as wingers behind a lone striker. In a three-man midfield, specialist wingers are sometimes deployed down the flanks alongside the central midfielder or playmaker.
Even more demanding is the role of wing-back, where the wide player is expected to provide both defence and attack. As the role of winger can be classed as a forward or a midfielder, so this role blurs the divide between defender and midfielder.

A winger is an attacking midfielder who is stationed in a wide position near the touchlines.

The responsibilities of the winger include:

  • Providing a “wide presence” as a passing option on the flank.
  • To beat the opposing full-back either with skill or with speed.
  • To read passes from the midfield that give them a clear crossing opportunity, when going wide, or that give them a clear scoring opportunity, when cutting inside towards goal.
  • To double up on the opposition winger, particularly when he is being “double-marked” by both the team’s full back and winger.

The stereotypical winger is fast, tricky and enjoys ‘hugging’ the touchline, that is, running downfield close to the touchline and delivering crosses. However, players with different attributes can thrive on the wing as well. Some wingers prefer to cut infield (as opposed to staying wide) and pose a threat as playmakers by playing diagonal passes to forwards or taking a shot at goal. Even players who are not considered quick, have been successfully fielded as wingers at club and international level for their ability to create play from the flank. Occasionally wingers are given a free role to roam across the front line and are relieved of defensive responsibilities.

The typical abilities of wingers include:

  • Technical skill to beat a full-back in a one-to-one situation.
  • Pace, to beat the full-back one-on-one.
  • Crossing ability when out wide.
  • Good off-the-ball ability when reading a pass from the midfield or from fellow attackers.
  • Good passing ability and composure, to retain possession while in opposition territory.

The modern winger should also be comfortable on either wing so as to adapt to quick tactical changes required by the coach.
Traditionally, right-footed players are played on the right wing and left-footed players on the left as a matter of familiarity and comfort. However, in the modern game, coaches usually demand wingers to be able to play on both flanks and to switch flanks during play regularly as a quick change of tactics. For instance, a right-footed winger who plays on the left flank is more comfortable cutting into the middle, which suits the styles of playmaker forwards who can cause a threat both by shooting from distance, dribbling towards goal, or sliding through passes to other forwards. Another advantage is that the winger can cut inside, towards the weaker foot of the full-back. Clubs such as Barcelona and Celtic often choose to play their wingers on the ‘wrong’ flank for this reason.

Messi / C. Ronaldo / Robinho / Giggs / Ribery / Robben / Nani / Overmars / Garrincha
Jairzinho / Figo / Joaquin / George Best / Silva / Joe Cole / Cruyff / Pires / Ronaldinho / Rivelino

Video below shows some wingers ability to take on players
httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVCXKj4hXJw

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